How I Hatch My Books From a Sentence & A Title #MRFW

Welcome to week 8 of the #MFRW 52- Week Blog Challenge! This week’s topic is how I choose a Book Title.

The truth is, most times I don’t choose my book title. The title chooses me.

MFRW Blog Challenge book titleI’m what they call a panster. For those non-savvy with writer-ly lingo, that means someone who “writes by the seat of their pants.” For someone like me, who loves yoga pants and sweats, this can get kind of sloppy and lead to an editing nightmare. Yikes!

This is as opposed to plotting out the story with outlines and extensive detailing before beginning to write. Me? I sit down and—go.

Writing is an Adventure

The problem I have with too much plotting is that then I know what’s going to happen and it’s not as fun to write. Most of the time, the characters tell me the story. They love to throw in a plot twist, or an unexpected character now and then.

How I Choose a Book Title

Okay, I’ve digressed; now back to the topic for this week, Book Titles. When my muse nags me with a new story, it usually taunts me with the very first line of the story. Then I’m all like, ‘You had me at hello’ and I want to know more.

The darn #muse really knows how to push my buttons. #MFRW book #titles Click To Tweet

But from that first line, I usually know the title even before I’ve written much of the story.

I must admit, often the first line gets moved in the story, or reworded once it’s edited and written, but to me, in my mind, it’s always the first line.

Here are a few examples of the ‘first line in my mind’ before editing, from my books:

Destiny Calling:

“A month ago, I stopped being a redhead.”

My muse shoved this line into my mind as I waited in a parking lot, watching a lone payphone ringing. No one answered it. What did that person want? Perhaps it was destiny calling, and no one answered?

Book TitleGrandma Must Die:

“I think I’m going to have to kill grandma.”

This line came out of thin air, leaving me to wonder just why anyone would want to kill any Grandma? But it was obvious by the way the line was delivered with resignation, and the tone of the character, that it had been a long road to reach this conclusion. Just what was that road? Time to start the adventure.

Do You Choose a Book By the Title?

Follow the Hop and Find Out How Other Authors Choose Their Book Title

About Me:

Maureen Bonatch dreamt of becoming a Solid Gold Dancer. When the show ended, she followed other paths. Surviving twins gave her confidence to belly dance, declare herself a tequila connoisseur and biker babe to her alpha hubby. She lives in small town Pennsylvania and her love of the four seasons—biking, sweat pants, hockey and hibernation—keeps her there. While immersed in paranormal romance and fantasy, she survives on caffeine, wine, music and laughter. A feisty Shih Tzu keeps her in line.

12 thoughts on “How I Hatch My Books From a Sentence & A Title #MRFW”

  1. Kenzie MichaelsKenzie Michaels

    LOL….when I sat down to write All She Ever Wanted, my character Amber jumped into my head while I was making dinner. I was at the stove when all of a sudden, this snarky voice in my head says, “Don’t get your knickers in a twist; I’m only doing this as a favor….” then a heated argument ensued. I had to stop cooking, tell my bickering characters to ‘hold on’, then went to the computer and wrote four pages before realizing if I didn’t stop, my kids were never going to be fed that night! The next day, I went back and filled in the rest of the story, and it wasn’t until the last line of the book that the title finally became clear!

    Reply
    February 24, 2017
    • MaureenMaureen

      Lol that is awesome Kenzie! Characters can be so demanding- and so fun! Thanks for visiting.

      Reply
      February 24, 2017
  2. Meka JamesMeka James

    Hello fellow pantser. I’m like you, I get an idea and the characters take over from there. It’s an adventure. People have asked if I know how a story will end and I’m like nope, they haven’t told me yet. LOL It’s fun that way. My titles hit me the same way the story does. And I have to ask, where can you still find a payphone? That part of your post is really intriguing.

    Reply
    February 24, 2017
  3. TrevannTrevann

    Fascinating read. Love some of those opening lines. I envy pantsers sometimes. The closest I get is taking my scene synopsis and filling it in.

    Reply
    February 24, 2017
  4. Mary J. McCoy-DresselMary J. McCoy-Dressel

    I love the title of your blog post as well as your book titles. I’m part plotter, but when in pantster-mode the real fun begins. Have a great weekend.

    Reply
    February 24, 2017

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